Oxonmoot, a path through history

Three days of homely gatherings, and talks and entertainment on the banks of Oxford waters and college grounds with around 100 people coming to honour Tolkien's works and his creations.

The alleyway of colleges leading to St. Anthony's

The sunlit grounds of the Radcliffe Observatory quarter

A secret door to St. Anthony's college

The main pedestrian street in the city centre

A pub in the opening ahead

St. Anthony's college grounds

Prologue

“…

O Elbereth! Gilthoniel!
     We still remember, we who dwell
In this far land beneath the trees
     Thy starlight on the Western Seas”.

(J. R. R. Tolkien, “The Lord of the Rings”, 1954; Book I, Chapter 3: Three Is Company)

A. Introduction

The grounds of St. Anthony's college

One of the buildings of St. Anthony's

A wall twined with ivy

Among century old trees and ivy-twined walls is where the 46th Oxonmoot takes place, a gathering of the Tolkiendili known all over the world. It is a quiet city, and a calm one; for the streets are full of wanderers and the hearts full of joy. There are willows at the waters of the canal and the wind in the crowns of trees dancing.

There are willows at the waters of the canal and the wind in the crowns of trees dancing.

— Of the Oxonmoot city

I arrive a couple of days earlier and in the lodge I encounter Beregond, who tells me of the two events I couldn't quite put the names to: the Telerin circle and the Enyalië, of which I thought the first one was a game or a dance and the second one a song. It turns out the circle is about reading books lying in front of readers in the lap in the late evening of the 1st day, deriving from the name Teleri, or Elves, in Tolkien's legendarium; and the second one is the thing (although, like Beregond says, “there will be a song”), a custom of visiting Tolkien's grave from which the Oxonmoot in the Tolkien society arose in the first place1. Having visited many of those events he can say a lot about them, and yet when I ask about differences to the recent Tolkien 2019 he cannot compare for them being too different.

More stories
 (See “Interview with Beregond” in “Interviews”)

I also learn from the lodge guard that one of the Tolkiendili had already been living there for a week, and see an impressive list of attendees which is around 90 so far as I can see. I also learn that there are Russian students on the campus.

In the alleyway of colleges away from the pubs, busy local streets and the famous sights stands the old St. Anthony's college with his impressive carved buildings and green brushwood of ivy stretching their arms and legs around them, having the stone deeply in their claws.

B. The city

Neighbouring houses at St. Anne's college

Bicycles at the city hall

Radcliffe camera next to the Bodleian library

On the day before Oxonmoot I explore Oxford's sights on a map and on foot, wondering about such dreams inspiring names as Angel meadow and Paradise street, while others are quite horror-infuming like Dead Man's Walk.

In Oxford quite a lot of women travel on bicycles with small rickshas in the backs for their kids. I also notice a lot of large dogs, uniformed students and city tour double-decker buses.

Some streets are so narrow a bus wouldn't fit into them, and the signs although very picturesque in an old typeface are at times hidden way down at the fences, or framed by the bindweed beautifully.

There are a lot of heraldry all around and wooden boats at the channel river, shaping the atmosphere of inspiring walks through the city.

More than half of the buildings in Oxford are colleges or schools, it seems. There are secret windows and old looking doors leading into the castles and beautiful round balls of flowers of violet, yellow and red and green hanging everywhere, and there's a smell of freshness and wood in the air.

There are secret windows and old looking doors leading into the castles and beautiful round balls of flowers of violet, yellow and red and green hanging everywhere, and there's a smell of freshness and wood in the air.

— Of Oxford

At the Oxford channel people are eating and reading and sunbathing among the willows (where the Oxford Canal Heritage Trail leads).

Up on a hill two boys are sitting with two trees behind their backs, high with the sun shining at us from above.

I notice a pine tree as tall as a ten storey house.

The birds are flying in the air as the sun is starting to warm its rays.

There's dark water in the rivers beneath the Christchurch meadow, and its trees keep the secrets of the old.

The Christchurch meadow hides squirrels and pelican-like birds, flowers of all colours. Behind a secret gate a path leads through while the door only opens for one person at a time to the sound of the pipe organ.

Among gothic rooftops and arcs rarely other buildings are found, and if they are, those are rather low-rise; the inhabitants queue for the bus, and the students run around at 5 pm and the tourists walk, and yet at 8 pm the city goes to sleep and the streets are empty.

There are so many cathedrals and castles and other gothic shaped buildings that at some point you stop noticing them, but parks and fields are perfectly visible in the sun around Oxford, and people are lying in the grass relaxing in the sun.

With its old buildings and pointed arcs, somehow Oxford reminds me of Paris with its freedom-loving atmosphere.

More stories
 (Story of the BNF Tolkien exhibition coming soon).

C. Day-by-day breakdown

  1. 1st day: A light in places
  2. 2nd day: A walk through the park
  3. 3rd day: A closing of doors

1. 1st day: A light in places

One of the buildings of St. Anthony's

The alleyway of colleges

The hidden bench with apples

There is a lot of construction going on in the college, and as I find out on the morning of the 13th it's for some kind of quarters, which rise from scratch to a construction almost as high as the buildings of the college (with windows and rooms and all).

St Anthony's a place of many buildings and passageways, all gothic shaped with ivy travelling up on the steady walls of the students' domiciles and places where there teach the professors.

The somehow winding roads lead in between the quarters, and there's often laughter and speech heard once the opening time draws near (while upon my arrival I only see a few stray passersby and a bench in the hidden corner is empty of people but full of red ripe apples).

The registration starts mid-day and continues to a walking tour of Oxford.

I am welcomed by the members of the committee at the registration which is in an old building reminding me of a forgotten library from Soviet era times.

A beautiful young girl arrives dragging her red suitcase behind and I learn that Priscilla2 had retired from welcoming newcomers and there's just a card being signed for her.

Walking tour of Oxford

One of the college gates

Tour participants taking pictures

Walking tour

Dropping by the houses and places of importance to Tolkien, I see a house with a balcony that a lady goes into and encounter another lady who like René van Rossenberg and John Garth visited Russia in the 1980s, and after learning Russian for 8 to 10 months can still remember “библиотековедение” (library studies) and saw books at the Lenin's library.

Colleges, the Oratory, and a number of other places including “The Bird and the Baby”3 we pass by where Tolkien used to live and create. I learn that the Exeter college had been redesigned and where Tolkien used to live is gone; “who on Earth is on top of the building” the guide does not know (Michael Towers). There are both green badges (newcomers) and white badges on the tour, and so far as the rumour goes, it stays pretty much the same; so do the major events like the visit to the grave, the quiz, and the reading circle.

We also pass by places where Oxonmoot was being held a while ago, and it has a very impressive history of taverns, colleges, and even the town hall is on the list. A walk guided by a man with a bag and a staff through the sunlit streets of Oxford who remembers one of the first Oxonmoots back in the 1980s (apparently the first one was in the 1970s). There used to be around 100 people in the beginning and then the numbers grew to between 200 and 300.

A walk guided by a man with a bag and a staff through the sunlit streets of Oxford.

— Of the walking tour

More stories
 (See “Interview with Michael Towers” in “Interviews”)

I learn that Priscilla had retired from welcoming guests to the Oxonmoot on its opening, and for a while Joanna4 would, but then it also stopped.

Dinner at the old building

Books at the Telerin circle

The Telerin circle readers

First timers' welcome

Past a staircase full of portraits and old pictures it leads to the balcony full of people. I'm told there are around 30 newcomers, but not all of them are there yet, some are coming in later, on Saturday; I see around a lot of white badges with people talking and laughing.

Some have costumes on and goblets, others just the usual clothes or banquet suits.

I relate my story of the guards at the border who are usually extremely strict (or at least told to be so) laughing and making jokes remembering the first time they saw a Tolkien movie and asking me which Tolkien's book is my favourite. People are quite amazed and I flash up happily remembering this trace of wonder.

Dinner

In a banner adorned room with two wooden tables and candlelit atmosphere Oxonmoot guests gather for dinner.

I ask about other countries' operas, plays and theatre performances on Tolkien and learn about the German musical with Billy Boyd (on tour this December) and “the pilots' translation” in Hebrew, Israel in “There and back again”.

There's talk about war, elections, and clothing.

We mention the acts of terrorism and as I ask how Tolkien would have referred to the topic had it been an issue back in his days I love the way Yariv Yaari refers to it: “The Orcs did this, that's Orc-work” (which is Elf-talk in Tolkien's description).

“The Orcs did this, that's Orc-work”.

— One of the guests about the acts of terrorism

Quiz

A quiz is in different teams, and I am joined by the German Gandalf5 from the Tolkien 2019 while I still notice some familiar faces from the previous event (like the costume with a sword young man and Denis Bridoux5). There are probably around 10 to 20—30 of them altogether so far as I can see.

People are guessing while in the corridor I hear the sounds of a guitar being played, counting on their fingers and ruffling up their memories of the texts and the legendarium.

I count 9 teams of around 10 people each and notice that there are paddles hanging over the bar.

It is a wonder how one idea grows into something that 100 years after the publication of the first book still lives while people around are searching for the places of fair and splendour on the map, from different countries as they come but one language they still speak and understand.

It is a wonder how one idea grows into something that 100 years after the publication of the first book still lives while people around are searching for the places of fair and splendour on the map, from different countries as they come but one language they still speak and understand.

— Of the Tolkien legendarium

How the idea stays is amazing with the names, and the maps, and the places and the drawings. It's like the Elves are still among us carrying candles and burning them leading a way into a forest full of joy and happiness, followed by those who know where to go.

It's like the Elves are still among us carrying candles and burning them leading a way into a forest full of joy and happiness, followed by those who know where to go.

— Of the Tolkien events

A man is trying to guess the answers holding one of his favourite Tolkien books to the heart in expectation of the Telerin circle. The crowd sings “Happy birthday” to a new member who celebrates her birthday at the Oxonmoot.

Telerin circle

The words shape into beautiful rounded protective circles that surround the room and light it with a light from within that is still seen around the world in spots that light up against the darkness, in a war that is far from being over, like a beacon for the peace in all worlds.

The words shape into beautiful rounded protective circles that surround the room and light it with a light from within that is still seen around the world in spots that light up against the darkness, in a war that is far from being over, like a beacon for the peace in all worlds.

— Of the creation

The reason I'm reading this is because we encounter still the bits and parts of war in our age that Tolkien mentioned, and to overcome them something really divine is needed, a light beyond darkness. I have a report that touches the theme of creation, and it is never easy, but always joyous. To me, a light is there in many of Tolkien's verses, and many of the events that I visit, and I write about them.

“Snow-white! Snow-white! O Lady clear!
     O Queen beyond the Western Seas!
O Light to us that wander here
     Amid the world of woven trees!

Gilthoniel! O Elbereth!
     Clear are thy eyes and bright thy breath!
Snow-white! Snow-white! We sing to thee
     In a far land beyond the Sea.

O stars that in the Sunless Year
     With shining hand by her were sown,
In windy fields now bright and clear
     We see your silver blossom blown!

O Elbereth! Gilthoniel!
     We still remember, we who dwell
In this far land beneath the trees
     Thy starlight on the Western Seas”.

(J. R. R. Tolkien, “The Lord of the Rings”, 1954; Book I, Chapter 3: Three Is Company)

2nd day: A walk through the park

Harp in the centre of the city

Radcliffe camera through park of the Exeter college

Park of Exeter college (open on Oxford open doors)

On the weekend of the 14th & 15th of September Oxford's colleges open their doors to the visitors, so Saturday opens up to be not just the most packed day on Oxonmoot programme but also a very busy and interesting excursion day, with museums and colleges and places of interest taking part in the excursion programme.

In the pedestrian street there are sounds of acoustic guitar and harp, and the city's covered market with numerous shops smells with bakery on a busy Saturday with people walking around while I hurry to see the Exeter college's garden and the dining hall that are normally closed on other days.

Beregond's report on Father Christmas

Hobbit bake-off contest and results

Dancing workshop in the sun near the main building

After Beregond's talk of the views from the rooftops of Oxford's buildings and even higher where Father Christmas flies in his carriage I ask one of the organizers about the first Oxonmoot and it turns out that the first one was in 1974.

Those used to be very informal meetings in pubs with few of the participants, and there aren't many of them around; I encounter an “Oxonmoot two” and a chance of seeing this or another “Oxonmoot one” person to talk to.

The name is supposed to derive from the “moot” which is a gathering and “Oxon” which is an informal word for Oxford, so an “Oxford gathering”.

The name is supposed to derive from the “moot” which is a gathering and “Oxon” which is an informal word for Oxford, so an “Oxford gathering”.

— Of the name “Oxonmoot”

Outside in the sun a group of merry people, Oxonmooters dressed as hobbits, Elves or else in a very mixed array of clothing are dancing to a variety of beautiful tunes, putting their hands together and glancing in the sun joyously laughing.

In the Nissan lecture theatre, a conference room with 9 rows of seats, Nick Groom reads his report on “Fellowship of the Ring”, surprising me with how uneasy it was for Tolkien to choose the titles for the volumes (being a late decision).

Oxonmoot organizers have blue badges and a lot of signs stamped onto their vests.

As the day goes into later hours and the lunch is further behind the theatre starts to fill.

An early Russian version of the Hobbit illustration in a rabbitlike way gets a lot of laughs in the Tolkien Art Slide show.

I see a lot of people wearing T-shirts, shorts, and sandies as the weather is quite warm and sunny during the day while the nights are quite cold; and also there are some dressed formally or in the flair of the conference.

Gradually I learn of the Oxonmoots as they used to be during their early years. It was all visiting pubs and interesting places in the city and bookshops. At the 2nd Oxonmoot they visited the English faculty library.

During the “Theseus myth” in Tolkien's works by Sandra Hartl though there are some sounds of people sleeping a lot is spoken about different studies of the myth.

My report “Tolkien's mythology: past, present, and future” at the Oxonmoot 2019 (picture by Charles Noad)

And then I present my “Tolkien mythology” report preparing for an interview with Michael Towers, the (improvised) guide of the Oxford walking tour on the 1st day.

I get general applause twice, before and after the single question (which are rare on my reports somehow), and proceed to an interview with Beregond, a member of one of the Swedish TS.

More stories
 (See “Interview with Beregond” in “Interviews”)

I encounter Charles who is named to be one of the first Oxonmooters around at the event along with Jessica. Whoever I ask point them out to me like the Elders, and they keep a memory of the young events. Charles has a chronology (published in the “Mallorn”)6 and Jessica is hiding in the shadows arranging the filking7.

Whoever I ask point them out to me like the Elders, and they keep a memory of the young events.

— Of the first Oxonmooters

I love watching the filking where everyone's singing along to the texts (handed out) and popular tunes like “All you need are rings” (particularly interesting considering Tolkiens' attitude to the band) and “What shall will do with the Gandalf underneath the Shadow” (see videos in “References”).

Many of the attendees have their own glasses in their hands and goblets.

St. Anthony's buildings

Filking at the Nissan lecture theatre (after reports)

Night falls at St. Anthony's

I see Elvish cloaks billowing in the twilight behind the walls of the college, and as I arrive the evening entertainment starts and I notice people in costumes.

There's poetry and a masquerade.

There are songs and poems in the dimly lit hall full of Tolkien lovers. The modern palantiri let them some tape the performances, while others are watching intently, the same way I notice people listen to excrepts from Tolkien books with their eyes closed in the Telerin circle.

My questions also finally reach a target, or two: I find the people who were at the 1st Oxonmoot, which happened, as I learn, in 1974. Their names are the ones everyone mentions when asked, and as I seek them out I get a more detailed information of the history of the event.

My questions also finally reach a target, or two: I find the people who were at the 1st Oxonmoot, which happened, as I learn, in 1974.

— Of the first Oxonmoot

More stories
 (See “Interview with one of the first Oxonmooters” in “Interviews”)

3. 3rd day: A closing of doors

One of the city's memorials and cemeteries

Cemetery with stone for Beren and Lúthien

Farewell sign (“See you soon”)

Sunday is the final day of Oxonmoot with the visit to the Tolkien grave and another day of Oxford open doors.

For the open doors, the colleges and other places taking part are decorated with the white and blue and golden balloons, and one can do a lot of things like climb the Carfax tower, see deers in the Magdalen College, go up the Chapel in the All Souls College and visit the Exeter college (chapel, dining hall, garden) and the special events at the Covered Market, and enter the examintation hall of the Bodelian library, see the rose garden of the Magdalen College School and the bridges.

On my way to the cemetery I learn that it is a custom to have a speech and sing Namárië during the visit.

There's a weekend fair we pass by selling fresh bread and mead, juice and handicrafts made by hand that we pass on our way to the outskirts of the city where the Wolvercote cemetery lies.

There used to be burial sites in the city centre, grim looking to me when I see them in Oxford next to churches and war memorials. They used to be next to chapels until they were cleared, and new cemeteries built.

And the war memorials with names started during the 1st war, some of them quite huge with a lot of names, and during the 2nd there were more.

There were also bombings, and London took the worst of it, for it was the capital with important places — and easier to reach.

Enyalië

There are large cones on the ground and joyous sounds of the ball game on the football field coming from kids playing, running and clapping.

The sun is warming up the visitors as they follow the signs to the sign of Beren and Lúthien.

I notice they have a tape recorder and among white angels and freshly brought flowers around a hundred Tolkiendili gather coming up in two buses (people say there used to be arrival by car around 1997 but then it was taking too long to gather them all and they engaged the buses).

The sun is warm on everybody's shoulders and they thank God all happy remembering the rain from the last year.

A white rose of a slight beige yellow colour grows next to where is written: “Beren & Lúthien”.

The trees are peaceful yet grim with the thoughts of the darkness beneath and only the Sun and the joyous cries and clapping from the playfield enliven the surroundings.

The trees are peaceful yet grim with the thoughts of the darkness beneath and only the Sun and the joyous cries and clapping from the playfield enliven the surroundings.

— Of the Wolvercote cemetery

A single white seagull soares high up in the clear blue sky barely distinguishable in the height above the city.

A single white seagull soares high up in the clear blue sky barely distinguishable in the height above the city.

— Of the Tolkien grave

People are silent and thoughtful after Namárië is sung and the flowers are laid.

On the way back I talk to Mike Towers, a member of the TS who helps with the organization, and learn about his knowledge of the Oxonmoot and its predecessors, the smaller and younger Oxonmoots back in the first years.

More stories
 (See “Interview with Michael Towers” in “Interviews”)

White swan at the surface of the river

Magdalene College School flourishing in roses

A spotted deer in the park

Oxford open doors

There are boats and a rose garden at the Magdalen College School, and with a fresh floral smell and a memory of white swans and white bridges I travel further.

The gondolieri of Magdalene bridge steer the wooden boats on the waters of river Cherwell.

I hear the name Tolkien as I wander through the streets and run into a couple of fans.

There's a concert in one of the theatres of the Bodelian library, a horrific line to the Carfax tower, and a relaxing atmosphere of blessed joy in the deer park of Magdalen college, where the animals walk in a park surrounded by an alleyway of trees. I see a spotted girl quite near, nibbling at something while the others are lying in the centre far ahead; the men are at the other end enjoying their rest lying down after an extremely hot day. Oaks and flowers surround the college's beautiful grounds as the sun's starting to set, and the boats keep coming. Strangely enough, I notice tents on the other bank of the river.

There are boats and a rose garden at the Magdalen College School, and with a fresh floral smell and a memory of white swans and white bridges I travel further. The gondolieri of Magdalene bridge steer the wooden boats on the waters of river Cherwell. There's a concert in one of the theatres of the Bodelian library, a horrific line to the Carfax tower, and a relaxing atmosphere of blessed joy in the deer park of Magdalen college, where the animals walk in a park surrounded by an alleyway of trees.

— Of the Oxford atmosphere

Farewell

The Oxonmoot is closed, and already everyone's expecting a next one; the college is empty without the Tolkiendili laughter and jokes like it was before they came; it calms down to its everyday life, while the Tolkien readers of the world live their lives, or “return to the real world”, as one of the Oxonmooters put it; although which one is real?

The Oxonmoot is closed, and already everyone's expecting a next one; the college is empty without the Tolkiendili laughter and jokes like it was before they came; it calms down to its everyday life, while the Tolkien readers of the world live their lives, or “return to the real world”, as one of the Oxonmooters put it; although which one is real?

— Of the reality of Tolkien's world

D. Conclusion

Bridge between the houses

The sword

St. Anne's college

The Oxonmoot's figures are around 100 visitors, and as I keep asking and looking out for familiar faces, I only encounter those I saw only briefly at the Tolkien 2019, and of them not many (except the organizers), maybe 10 to 20 people, although there might be more.

Oxford is a great city, and a flourishing one; with the many colleges and rivers, the Oxfordians finish their work at around 5, and leave the streets completely around 8, or at least it is so in the colder days when autumn is setting in.

The attendance of the events seems to be higher towards noon, with Beregond lecture having almost a full theatre (all events run at the same venue, accessible through the first library-like building).

To me it seems that the international involvement is much less (although it is often explained with the preceding T2019 conference), and I also encounter few Russians at the Oxonmoot.

The attendance is very high however at the entertainment events in the dining hall and in the bar and at the visit to the memorial itself, probably the highest throughout the conference, although the trip to the Wolvercote cemetery is on Sunday morning and a lot of people check out just before that, for the St. Anthony's college has a very strict and early rules for vacating the rooms.

Overall the most joyous are the meetings with the like-minded people, a fact that everyone here seems to notice and to anticipate with a lot of warmth towards the new year of the oncoming event; it seems even those who do come to T2019 as well as to Oxonmoot, to Birmingham as well as to Oxford, still make a difference in their minds about the 2 events and how they feel about them; the first, more formal entertaining, the other, a very home-like meeting of friends.

I notice some people just hanging around talking to others, rarely appearing at the events or entertainment, visiting almost none of the events on the programme; others (a lot) showing or popping into most of what's on the programme, but not always staying until the very end; and some taking in the celebration from the first to the very last bit.

Still the Oxonmoot seems to fulfill all the hopes and live up to many of the expectations, with both the initial idea of meeting next to a place where Tolkien lived and created to celebrate and honour his memory (what they call the "old format") and a newer invention, the entertainment and the flair aimed at the newcomers (to brighten their interest in the subject).

And the reason for this meeting still stays and is, still was and there will be a beautiful and shiny memory of a creation so pure and fair like few in these worlds, a star so bright as rare seen in the sky, a glow so perfect that dazzles not but warms.

And the reason for this meeting still stays and is, still was and there will be a beautiful and shiny memory of a creation so pure and fair like few in these worlds, a star so bright as rare seen in the sky, a glow so perfect that dazzles not but warms.

— Of the worlds Tolkien created

E. Things I liked and disliked

Willows at the river Cherwell

Books at the Telerin circle

Gondolieri of the Madgalen bridge

Things I liked

  1. Homely atmosphere in a circle of friends
  2. Easy access to all events in closely located rooms
  3. Friendly attitude and joyful mood
  4. Very happy emotions of the people coming together
  5. A great tradition
  6. A lot of jokes, smiles, and fun
  7. A great anticipation of the excitement

Things I disliked

  1. The event is too short
  2. The distance from the college to the centre (would've liked a closer distance)
  3. The smaller amount of people this year
  4. The shorter duration of the event this year

Things I liked most

  1. The joyous atmosphere of a homely gathering of friends
  2. The feeling of a general understanding
  3. A wide variety of works that celebrate Tolkien

F. Special feature: Interviews 
Exclusive

Beregond's report on the second day

Hobbit bake-off in the reception area

Michael Tower's walking tour of Oxford

  1. Beregond: Of the Tolkien events in Northern hemisphere
  2. One of the first Oxonmooters: Of the first Oxonmoot and how it changed
  3. Michael Towers: Of the tour of the city and the change in the hearts

  1. Beregond
  2. A long-standing member of the Tolkien society, Beregond (Anders Stenström) from Sweden is a kind of person to know a lot of answers to many questions, both in quizzes and in real life.

    How Tolkien events are different for their visitors and organizers, of Tolkien manuscripts and their importance, and of unexpected finds.

  3. One of the first Oxonmooters
  4. Of the first Oxonmoot and how it changed.

    Why and how the Tolkiendili met back long time ago and how they meet their husbands and wives now, of the films and their influence and of the importance of filking.

  5. Michael Towers
  6. Of the tour of the city and the change in the hearts.

    How to make a tour for the Tolkiendili through the streets of Oxford, of the history of Oxomoot and the role of meetings.

G. References

— Official Oxonmoot website
— TS Facebook page reports

Photographs and videos
— My videos (published soon)

H. Articles about Tolkien events

Articles about Tolkien events in Moscow and worldwide

Articles about Tolkien events in Moscow and worldwide, a faerie tale adventure full of hopes, smiles and surprises.

A wonderous tale of modern-day encounters with Elves, faeries, and other creatures in our universe.

I travel a lot, and visiting Tolkien events worldwide has become one of my favourite activities. The adventures, the hidden treasure behind secret doors, and the courage to follow the path of awakening are all there in my articles about the places that I visit and people I meet.

Here are always the most recent entries followed by an impressive list of previous articles which might some day become a book or a magazine for those who love and care about Tolkien's legendarium.

A great adventure lies behind, while another one awaits.

Oxonmoot, a path through history, Sept 2019
Special feature: Interviews 

Exclusive

Tolkien 2019, on the edge of the faerie, Aug 2019
Special feature: Interviews 

Exclusive

First Tolkien-only museum opens in Moscow, Apr 2019
Special feature: Interviews 

Exclusive

A journey into the Tolkien's legendarium on this Earth and the events that happen around the globe when the adventure begins.

Remarks:

1 Like (in the form of) “Why don't we go pay a visit to Tolkien's grave?”

2 Priscilla Tolkien, Tolkien's daughter and effective vice-president of the Tolkien society.

3 “The Eagle and the Child”, famous pub near the city centre where Tolkien's group used to meet.

4 Joanna Tolkien, Tolkien's relative.

5 Members of the Tolkien society: Jens Goetz (Germany) and Denis Bridoux (France), who researched Aubusson tapestries (“Aubusson weaves Tolkien”).

6 Journal of the Tolkien society.

7 Popular tunes with words from Tolkien's legendarium.

Forum discussion


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